A Treasure Trove of Miscellany

Here at Indies Unlimited, we scour the globe to bring you news of all kinds of doings, happenings, events and stuff like that. Here are a few interesting tidbits from around the old net.

First there is a period, then there is no period, then there is. It seems like the correct style for writing abbreviations is in flux. Daily Writing Tips answers questions about abbreviations.

My Bologna has a first name…If you haven’t heard of the Bologna Children’s Book Fair before, it’s kind of a big deal.

The MIT Technology Review discovered that Amazon has the data that all advertisers want—what millions of people are shopping for—and now it plans to use it. Probably for evil. Maybe not.

Pity for the Penguin? Publisher’s Lunch says maybe thing don’t look quite as rosy for Pearson as they are letting on.

The Business of Books has an interesting article on good reasons writers should consider submitting to lit mags.

Indie News Beat:
Is the Glass Half Empty or Half Full?

As the year draws to a close, numerous publications, blogs, and authors are beginning to take stock, heave a sigh, and wonder if next year will be the same rollercoaster ride as this year has been. One of the best posts I’ve come across so far is here, where Anne R. Allen gives a neat overview, delivered in an accessible and enjoyable tone, of the many recent and rapid changes. While I’m no fan of the word “dynamic”, it is difficult to think of a more appropriate word to describe events in the two main parts of the same publishing industry: Mainstream and Indie. Continue reading “Indie News Beat:
Is the Glass Half Empty or Half Full?”

Department of Justice Decision Released

Dept. of Justice has determined that the proposed “final judgment” provides “an appropriate and effective remedy” for the antitrust violations. They are quoted as saying that the comments to dismiss the case were being submitted “by those who have an interest in seeing consumers pay more for e-books…”

The DoJ showed little interest in the comments from some of the big players in the industry, including Barnes & Noble, Books-A-Million and the Authors Guild. They go further to say that arguments that Amazon will eventually monopolize the e-book industry as “highly speculative at best.”

The DoJ also noted that not all authors objected to the settlement. Apparently, many mainstream or traditionally published authors were against the settlement. The largest group in favor of the settlement was self-published authors. In one comment by a group of self-published authors, the traditional publishers and literary agents were described as “… all kinds of middlemen which have gone from being indispensable to optional … “ Continue reading “Department of Justice Decision Released”

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